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Digital Art Characteristics

Have you ever heard of the term ‘digital art’? And can you give a definition of the term? Many people know the term but find it quite difficult to describe. And that is not surprising, because the boundaries of digital art are constantly being stretched. With the advent of the computer in the 1970s and certainly also after the introduction of the internet, artists and artists are constantly inventing new forms of digital art. The most famous museums of digital art are the Digital Art Museum and the Museum of Computer Art.

Static art, created on the computer
Art created with the aid of a computer is digital art. You can think of:

  • Edited images
  • Art created with digital drawing programs
  • Art that arose from the algorithms of special design programs

Moving picture
Art based on moving images or video equipment also falls under digital art. Pipilotti Rist is a well-known video artist, who exhibited, for example, in the video room of the Museum Boijmans van Beuningen. A very lackluster example of moving art is the aquarium and the fireplace on your television screen. Affordable art does not (yet) have moving digital art. If you want to buy this form of digital art, we, unfortunately, have to disappoint you.

Art based on the internet
Digital art can also consist of the form of the Internet. In principle, internet art only exists on the internet. Created by and for the web, it ignores all the original rules of art. With internet art, the artists try to stay innovative, a kind of new hippie era. You can also watch some art demonstrations on TV channels such as ‘iptv‘.

There is still a newer movement that is poking fun at the internet and internet art. The artists of this movement actually rebel against the internet and its addictions. You see this kind of art mainly in galleries and museums and not so easily in someone’s private rooms. Finally, we know a digital art movement that focuses on games, such as Tetris and the Sims. These and many more games are showcased at art festivals and exhibitions around the world.

Digital art – Blue GirlArt and digital installations
Digital installations can also form the basis of digital art. In this technique, interaction with the audience is very important. One of the more famous digital installation art exhibitions is the GLOW festival in Eindhoven, which takes place annually in November. For example, laser and light shows fall under this art form.

Virtual reality art
With virtual reality art, you can walk around in a painting, as it were. This can be very surreal, but also vary based on truth. You can immerse yourself in thousands of lights, but you can also walk around famous houses. This art is still very experimental. Artists are still investigating how they can blow the audience away.

The hallmarks of digital art
Digital art that you can buy at Affordable Art, for example, has a number of similar characteristics:

  • The work of art is based on a (number of) photo (s), which have been digitally processed.
  • Digital art is reproducible, without compromising on quality.
  • Because the art can be manipulated, it can always change, like the painting Girl on white/red by BAS, from the collection of Affordable Art.
  • Digital art is often interactive.

How Art Improved Digitally

2D and 3D graphics – digital graphics, as a rule, created using computer graphics editors in two or three-dimensional virtual space. Includes digital painting, digital sculpture, digital photography. Separately, I would like to mention such a direction as Pixel Art.

It is Pixel Art that is considered truly labor art in digital art, despite the endless possibilities of today’s computers, tablets, and smartphones.

They started talking about computer graphics after the experiments of Jay W. Forrester, an engineer in the computer laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1951. The forerunners of computer images include his first unpretentious pictures of dots and letters, obtained on telegraph teleprinters, and later on printing devices connected to computers.

Video mapping (3D-mapping) is a video projection onto a physical object of the environment (buildings, structures, landscape elements), taking into account its geometry and location in space. The more monumental the structure, the more ghostly it becomes from special effects and optical illusions. Projections create the feeling that objects glow from the inside and live their own lives, changing their shape, size, and their very essence. Over the past 10 years, the method has firmly established itself in the entertainment industry, despite the fact that it was demonstrated to the general public back in 1969 in the United States by Walt Disney at the opening of a new attraction.

Live Video Art (VJ) – the creation of visual works in real-time, a high-tech and emotional fusion of manual work and complex algorithms – from simple video accompaniment to music to deep non-linear stories. The essence of this approach is the development and playing of the emerging images “here and now”, a momentary ephemeral journey according to the feelings of the audience; Vijing techniques and techniques are scattered from computer games to arthouse cinema. Most of all, this movement has taken root in clubs and at festivals, but the best examples have been accepted with honor in the academic environment of museums and galleries.

Generative design is an approach to the design and design of a digital product (website, image, melody, architectural model, detail, animation, etc.), in which a person delegates part of the processes to computer technologies and platforms.

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Unlike traditional design and design tools, generative systems semi-autonomously create solutions, which changes the nature of human interaction with the system: a program is no longer a tool, but a full-fledged participant in the creative process, a “partner”.

Data Art is the visualization of large amounts of information, their presentation in a visual balanced form that allows (literally) to capture with a glance both the general structure and the nuances of biological objects, physical phenomena, and processes. Starting with applied problems, it has grown into an independent movement with its own aesthetics, dictating rules, and more classical approaches.

Of course, everything is not limited to the visual part.

Interactive art involves the viewer as a full partner in the work. Human intuitive interaction with techno attractions can be much more engaging than the most sophisticated screenplays. The simplest example: the Greek artist Petros Vrellis has developed an application, by installing which, the user gets the opportunity to change the painting by Van Gogh “Starry Night” – to set the strokes in a different direction, add lighting or musical accompaniment, etc.