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Painting: important for children

Have you ever thought about stimulating your child’s imagination by painting? This leisure activity, which is both exciting and playful, not only encourages creative outbursts but also benefits your child in very special situations. Your child will learn some fun facts about painting while doing it.

Why is painting so important for children?

On the surface, painting is just a game, and especially at first the first attempts with a pencil, brush, and paper are more likely to be more like doodling. At some point, however, seemingly random lines may turn into a house – and then join a tree, a pet, the family, and maybe cars or other objects. Is the car way too big compared to the house? That’s right, so next time you’ll draw it a little smaller – and your child will already train their spatial imagination and understand relationships such as dimensions and dimensions of objects.

Perhaps your child also likes to paint faces: The first time they try to draw, they will look very rudimentary, but after many attempts, the proportions and distances between nose, mouth, and eyes are suddenly correct. Through constant repetition, your child gets a precise eye for details and learns that even the small, rather inconspicuous things can be of immense importance – in their whole life and not just when painting. Your child will love this form of learning because both boys and girls always like to take pen and paper in hand.

Painting for a positive development

Painting can promote completely different aspects of your child’s development. Both gross and fine motor skills are stimulated through painting. The finest lines sometimes decide between a successful picture and an average result – and children notice that quickly, which is why they will try to keep a steady hand with the lines.

Due to this fact, painting can be decisive for spelling as well: If you can draw clean lines and strokes early on, you won’t have any problems with letters that are complicated from a children’s perspective. Writing is then often perceived as an extension of the painting skills and your child will find the activity fun.